Tulsi Mala
Tulsi Mala
Tulsi Mala

Tulsi Mala (27 Beads + 1 Bindu)

Shipping & Return Policy

***Please allow 3-5 Business Days to process your order***

Domestic Orders

We offer several shipping options for domestic orders. The LSRF shop is also pleased to offer media mail for all eligible items (books, cds & dvds). Simply add media mail in the check out notes and we will refund you the difference in postage.  We will not be able to offer media mail on any other items.

International Orders

In addition to shipping, international orders may incur customs charges placed by the country of destination. It is a good idea to check with your customs ministry to find out about taxes and fees on imported goods before making a purchase.

Missing Mail

It happens, mail gets lost in the post. We do our best to verify addresses and scan for errors but things fall through the cracks. Please be sure to verify your contact information and shipping address when you receive your order confirmation. You can always email us if there is a mistake on your order.

If have not received your order 5 business days after expected arrival please contact us. We will look into your order and start a claims process to determine  a course of action.

Returns


Our policy lasts 30 days. If 30 days have gone by since your purchase, unfortunately we can’t offer you a refund or exchange.

To be eligible for a return, your item must be unused and in the same condition that you received it. It must also be in the original packaging. Please notify us of your return and mail your product to:

Love Serve Remember Foundation
PO Box 1137
Weaverville, NC 28787
USA

Once we have received the item we will process your refund.

Exchanges (if applicable)

We only replace items if they are defective or damaged. If you need to exchange it for the same item notify us and send your item to:

Love Serve Remember Foundation
PO Box 1137
Weaverville, NC 28787
USA

Shipping Returns and Exchanges

You will be responsible for paying for your own shipping costs for returning or exchanging your item. Shipping costs are non-refundable. If you receive a refund, the cost of return shipping will be deducted from your refund.

Depending on where you live, the time it may take for your exchanged product to reach you, may vary.

If you are shipping an item over $75, you should consider using a trackable shipping service or purchasing shipping insurance. We don’t guarantee that we will receive your returned item.

Handcrafted Malas directly from India. Cotton string with 8mm beads. Auspicious number of 27 Beads + 1 Bindu. 

Tulsi or Holy Basil is revered as the holiest of all plants in Hinduism. Many legends are written about Tulsi representing the embodiment of Lakshmi and Vrinda; wives of Vishnu.  It is said that honoring the sacredness of the Tulsi plant grants devotees Lord Hanuman's protection and grace. 

  • Made in India
  • Cotton Tassle
  • Tulsi Wood Beads
  • Bead Size: 7mm
  • Mala Size: 3"
  • Photo Credits: Tanja Kuić

Ram Dass walks us through the basics on Malas in this article. 

What is a Mala?

A mala, is a string of beads. Used to chant the names of God. It’s the same thing as prayer beads. Or a rosary. A Hindu mala typically has either 108 beads. 108 being considered a sacred number in Hinduism. Likewise, 27 beads, which is one-fourth of 108. In addition to the 108 or 27 “counting beads,” a mala generally has an additional bead. Called the “guru bead.” Which hangs perpendicular to the circle of counting beads.

How to use a Mala

A Hindu mala is usually worked with by using the right hand. The mala is held resting over the third finger of the right hand, and the beads are brought toward you, one by one, using the thumb. Each bead counts one repetition of the mantra. When you get around to the guru bead, you don’t count it, and you don’t pass it; you stop there, mentally bow to the guru, flip the mala around, and start going back the other way. Each time you come to the guru bead you awaken once more, then you turn around and go back the way you came.

Which hand do I use my mala with?

Now for those of you who are left-handed (as I am): In India, you would be inclined to use the right hand anyway, because of certain cultural traditions. The Tibetans, on the other hand, have no such rules; they use their malas in either hand, and with any finger.

In the Hindu tradition, you can use any finger of the right hand to hold the beads, except for the first finger, which is the pointing or “accusing” finger; you don’t use that one. The reason most people use the third finger is that there is a nerve on the inside of that finger which is connected to your spine in such a way that you’re getting a little added benefit from the practice. It’s similar to an acupressure point, and it adds a little extra energy rush to the process.

Mala Adds Another Dimension to Your Practice

Doing a mantra doesn’t require using a mala; the mala is just there to add another dimension to the practice. Besides speaking the mantra, and hearing the mantra as you speak it, the process becomes tactile as well. If you want a psychological analysis of the use of a mala, you could say that it is a “kinesthetic cue device.” Without it, you could be doing the mantra and get lost in doing it mechanically. But if you suddenly feel the bead between your fingers, it wakes you up again. Bead by bead – it’s like the steps of a ladder, walking you straight into the Brahman.

Neem Karoli Baba

Product Details

  • Made in India
  • Cotton Tassle
  • Tulsi Wood Beads
  • Bead Size: 7mm
  • Mala Size: 3"
  • Photo Credits: Tanja Kuić

How to use a Mala

Ram Dass walks us through the basics on Malas in this article. 

What is a Mala?

A mala, is a string of beads. Used to chant the names of God. It’s the same thing as prayer beads. Or a rosary. A Hindu mala typically has either 108 beads. 108 being considered a sacred number in Hinduism. Likewise, 27 beads, which is one-fourth of 108. In addition to the 108 or 27 “counting beads,” a mala generally has an additional bead. Called the “guru bead.” Which hangs perpendicular to the circle of counting beads.

How to use a Mala

A Hindu mala is usually worked with by using the right hand. The mala is held resting over the third finger of the right hand, and the beads are brought toward you, one by one, using the thumb. Each bead counts one repetition of the mantra. When you get around to the guru bead, you don’t count it, and you don’t pass it; you stop there, mentally bow to the guru, flip the mala around, and start going back the other way. Each time you come to the guru bead you awaken once more, then you turn around and go back the way you came.

Which hand do I use my mala with?

Now for those of you who are left-handed (as I am): In India, you would be inclined to use the right hand anyway, because of certain cultural traditions. The Tibetans, on the other hand, have no such rules; they use their malas in either hand, and with any finger.

In the Hindu tradition, you can use any finger of the right hand to hold the beads, except for the first finger, which is the pointing or “accusing” finger; you don’t use that one. The reason most people use the third finger is that there is a nerve on the inside of that finger which is connected to your spine in such a way that you’re getting a little added benefit from the practice. It’s similar to an acupressure point, and it adds a little extra energy rush to the process.

Mala Adds Another Dimension to Your Practice

Doing a mantra doesn’t require using a mala; the mala is just there to add another dimension to the practice. Besides speaking the mantra, and hearing the mantra as you speak it, the process becomes tactile as well. If you want a psychological analysis of the use of a mala, you could say that it is a “kinesthetic cue device.” Without it, you could be doing the mantra and get lost in doing it mechanically. But if you suddenly feel the bead between your fingers, it wakes you up again. Bead by bead – it’s like the steps of a ladder, walking you straight into the Brahman.

Neem Karoli Baba