Red Carnelian Mala
Gemstone Malas
Gemstone Malas
Japa Bags
Lotus Seed & Rainbow of Gemstone Mala
Lotus Seed & Rainbow of Gemstone Mala
Rudraska Seed and Rainbow of Gemstone Mala
Rudraska Seed and Rainbow of Gemstone Mala
Rudraska Seed and Lapis Lazuli Mala
Rudraska Seed and Lapis Lazuli Mala
Rudraska Seed and Quartz Mala
Rudraska Seed and Quartz Mala
Red Carnelian Mala
Carnelian Mala
Agate Mala
Jasper Mala
Agate Mala
Japa Bags

Gemstone Malas

Shipping Policy

Please allow 2-3 business days to prepare your order. We fulfill 3 times a week in our shop.

Shipping times will vary depending on the service you have chosen and does not include the time it takes to process your order.

We do not offer any express or next day service unless we have communicated directly and can confirm our availability to do this.

Donors can choose desired shipping service at checkout. We offer USPS, UPS for domestic mail and USPS, DHL for international mail.

International Orders

Please note that due to COVID-19 packages may be delayed up to 30 days. Double check with your postal and customs ministry to make sure it is accepting packages from other countries.

In addition to shipping, international orders may incur customs charges placed by the country of destination. It is a good idea to check with your customs ministry to find out about taxes and fees on imported goods before making a purchase.

Missing Mail

In the event that your package does not arrive within the expected estimated window of time we recommend following some preliminary steps:

  • Review your order confirmation and check for address errors
  • Review your tracking information to see if there are updates
  • Visit your local post office to see if they have additional information on the whereabouts of the package.
  • Email Us or fill out the form below and include the following.
    • Name
    • Order#
    • Information about your case.

Once we hear from you we will begin investigating the whereabouts of your missing package and get back to you.

These beautiful one-of-a-kind gemstone malas were brought in by our artist friend Thais Aquino.

While she was visiting Krishna's city of Vrindaban she was inspired to curate some fundraising items for the Be Here Now Network.


Free Shipping Included.

All malas contain 108 beads with the exception of the Lotus Rainbow mala which only has 54 beads.

Necklace Length (Inches)

  • Carnelian Rosewood - 21"
  • Rudraksha Seed & Lapis - Lazuli 23.5"
  • Rudraksha Rainbow - 23"
  • Lotus Rainbow - 19"
  • Red Carnelian -  22"
  • Agate - 23"
  • Rudraksha Seed & Quartz - 16"
  • Jasper - 18.5"

Ram Dass walks us through the basics on Malas in this article. 

What is a Mala?

A mala, is a string of beads. Used to chant the names of God. It’s the same thing as prayer beads. Or a rosary. A Hindu mala typically has either 108 beads. 108 being considered a sacred number in Hinduism. Likewise, 27 beads, which is one-fourth of 108. In addition to the 108 or 27 “counting beads,” a mala generally has an additional bead. Called the “guru bead.” Which hangs perpendicular to the circle of counting beads.

How to use a Mala

A Hindu mala is usually worked with by using the right hand. The mala is held resting over the third finger of the right hand, and the beads are brought toward you, one by one, using the thumb. Each bead counts one repetition of the mantra. When you get around to the guru bead, you don’t count it, and you don’t pass it; you stop there, mentally bow to the guru, flip the mala around, and start going back the other way. Each time you come to the guru bead you awaken once more, then you turn around and go back the way you came.

Which hand do I use my mala with?

Now for those of you who are left-handed (as I am): In India, you would be inclined to use the right hand anyway, because of certain cultural traditions. The Tibetans, on the other hand, have no such rules; they use their malas in either hand, and with any finger.

In the Hindu tradition, you can use any finger of the right hand to hold the beads, except for the first finger, which is the pointing or “accusing” finger; you don’t use that one. The reason most people use the third finger is that there is a nerve on the inside of that finger which is connected to your spine in such a way that you’re getting a little added benefit from the practice. It’s similar to an acupressure point, and it adds a little extra energy rush to the process.

Mala Adds Another Dimension to Your Practice

Doing a mantra doesn’t require using a mala; the mala is just there to add another dimension to the practice. Besides speaking the mantra, and hearing the mantra as you speak it, the process becomes tactile as well. If you want a psychological analysis of the use of a mala, you could say that it is a “kinesthetic cue device.” Without it, you could be doing the mantra and get lost in doing it mechanically. But if you suddenly feel the bead between your fingers, it wakes you up again. Bead by bead – it’s like the steps of a ladder, walking you straight into the Brahman.

Thais is a visual poet. She is a black-indigenous immigrant woman who has lived in New York for the past 4 years. Thais’ unique Brazilian spirit guides her passion in the discovery of the natural world, feminine consciousness and truth. Thais' spiritual path is her gateway to a world of creation, harmony, truth and beauty. Her art is a creative manifestation of her longing, intimate connection with the feminine heart and her desire to belong among constant transformation. She creates because she is curious of what it could be. She creates from where she is in life. She believes we all have an inherent natural capacity to gravitate towards wholeness, regeneration, healing, uniqueness and deep innocence. She comes from a mystical family of spiritualists from Brazil and although she is deeply connected to the earth, her family members seem to have forgotten her indigenous heritage and wisdom. Her longing as an artist, photographer, writer, dancer, seeker, designer is to remember nature’s wisdom. As she evolves in her spiritual journey she learns how to plant her feet right here on earth and remember the conscious ways of living and healing through the art of the dark goddess. On quiet days she hears her amazonian indigenous ancestors whispering, "through grounding and nature awareness you will become your own medicine and remember your life’s work.”

Item Details

All malas contain 108 beads with the exception of the Lotus Rainbow mala which only has 54 beads.

Necklace Length (Inches)

  • Carnelian Rosewood - 21"
  • Rudraksha Seed & Lapis - Lazuli 23.5"
  • Rudraksha Rainbow - 23"
  • Lotus Rainbow - 19"
  • Red Carnelian -  22"
  • Agate - 23"
  • Rudraksha Seed & Quartz - 16"
  • Jasper - 18.5"

How to use a Mala

Ram Dass walks us through the basics on Malas in this article. 

What is a Mala?

A mala, is a string of beads. Used to chant the names of God. It’s the same thing as prayer beads. Or a rosary. A Hindu mala typically has either 108 beads. 108 being considered a sacred number in Hinduism. Likewise, 27 beads, which is one-fourth of 108. In addition to the 108 or 27 “counting beads,” a mala generally has an additional bead. Called the “guru bead.” Which hangs perpendicular to the circle of counting beads.

How to use a Mala

A Hindu mala is usually worked with by using the right hand. The mala is held resting over the third finger of the right hand, and the beads are brought toward you, one by one, using the thumb. Each bead counts one repetition of the mantra. When you get around to the guru bead, you don’t count it, and you don’t pass it; you stop there, mentally bow to the guru, flip the mala around, and start going back the other way. Each time you come to the guru bead you awaken once more, then you turn around and go back the way you came.

Which hand do I use my mala with?

Now for those of you who are left-handed (as I am): In India, you would be inclined to use the right hand anyway, because of certain cultural traditions. The Tibetans, on the other hand, have no such rules; they use their malas in either hand, and with any finger.

In the Hindu tradition, you can use any finger of the right hand to hold the beads, except for the first finger, which is the pointing or “accusing” finger; you don’t use that one. The reason most people use the third finger is that there is a nerve on the inside of that finger which is connected to your spine in such a way that you’re getting a little added benefit from the practice. It’s similar to an acupressure point, and it adds a little extra energy rush to the process.

Mala Adds Another Dimension to Your Practice

Doing a mantra doesn’t require using a mala; the mala is just there to add another dimension to the practice. Besides speaking the mantra, and hearing the mantra as you speak it, the process becomes tactile as well. If you want a psychological analysis of the use of a mala, you could say that it is a “kinesthetic cue device.” Without it, you could be doing the mantra and get lost in doing it mechanically. But if you suddenly feel the bead between your fingers, it wakes you up again. Bead by bead – it’s like the steps of a ladder, walking you straight into the Brahman.

About Thais Aquino

Thais is a visual poet. She is a black-indigenous immigrant woman who has lived in New York for the past 4 years. Thais’ unique Brazilian spirit guides her passion in the discovery of the natural world, feminine consciousness and truth. Thais' spiritual path is her gateway to a world of creation, harmony, truth and beauty. Her art is a creative manifestation of her longing, intimate connection with the feminine heart and her desire to belong among constant transformation. She creates because she is curious of what it could be. She creates from where she is in life. She believes we all have an inherent natural capacity to gravitate towards wholeness, regeneration, healing, uniqueness and deep innocence. She comes from a mystical family of spiritualists from Brazil and although she is deeply connected to the earth, her family members seem to have forgotten her indigenous heritage and wisdom. Her longing as an artist, photographer, writer, dancer, seeker, designer is to remember nature’s wisdom. As she evolves in her spiritual journey she learns how to plant her feet right here on earth and remember the conscious ways of living and healing through the art of the dark goddess. On quiet days she hears her amazonian indigenous ancestors whispering, "through grounding and nature awareness you will become your own medicine and remember your life’s work.”